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STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

SCARS book cover

Kendra must face her past and stop hurting herself--before it's too late.

Awards: #1 in the Top 10 ALA Quick Picks, ALA's Rainbow List, a Governor General Literary Award Finalist, Staff Pick for Teaching Tolerance.

Yes, it's my own arm on the cover of SCARS.

HUNTED book cover

Caitlyn, a telepath in a world where having any paranormal power at all can kill her, must decide between saving herself or saving the world.

Awards: A finalist for the Monica Hughes Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy, and the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award.

PARALLEL VISIONS book cover

Kate sees visions of the future--but only when she has an asthma attack. When she "sees" her sister being beaten, and a schoolmate killing herself, Kate must trigger more attacks--but that could kill her.

Awards: 2013 Gold Winner, Wise Bear Digital Awards, YA Paranormal category.

STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

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Uplifting Picture Books That Don't Preach


Willow

Review

Willow
by Denise Brennan-Nelson and Rosemarie Brennan, illustrated by Cyd Moore
Sleeping Bear Press,(May 2008)
ISBN-10: 1585363421
ISBN-13: 9781585363421

My rating:



Even on the sunniest days, Miss Hawthorn's art room was cold and dark.
Everything was in its place.
There wasn't a single broken crayon in the bunch.
The students sat in their rows, silent and still, like eggs in a carton.
Except for Willow.
... All the students painted trees with straight brown trunks and round green tops.
Everyone except Willow.
"Whoever heard of a pink tree?" Miss Hawthorn asked with a frown.
"That's what I saw when I closed my eyes," said Willow.
--Willow by Denise Brennan-Nelson and Rosemary Brennan, illustrated by Cyd Moore, p. 1, 4.

I love picture books that are affirming and life-loving, encouraging creativity and self-expression. Willow offers all that and more.

Creativity, the ability to express yourself, and being yourself even when others disapprove are so important. They can help bring real happiness and peacefulness. Picture book Willow encourages all those things in an uplifting story.

Willow loves creating art. She's a free spirit who follows her heart when she paints, creating pink trees and blue apples. She does this even in her art class at school, where her teacher, Miss Hawthorn, is an unhappy, stifling woman who tries to make all the children conform and paint only what she thinks things look like--imitating life, not encouraging real creativity or expression. The class is subdued and obedient, all except Willow. Miss Hawthorn dislikes Willow because of this, and because Willow shows her an art book with art that is creative and different.

One day, Willow gives Miss Hawthorn a gift--the art book. Over the holidays, Miss Hawthorn reads the book, and when the class comes back, they find their classroom and Miss Hawthorn changed--from a tight, cold classroom into a lush, creative, mind-opening classroom where artistic expression is encouraged.

Authors' Brennan-Nelson and Brennan's story is uplifting and encouraging. I love how creative Willow is, and how she never lets herself get daunted or suppressed by Miss Hawthorn and the rest of the class, but continues being creative. She is a strong character who subtly reminds readers to be themselves. The book encourages creativity and unique expression, and to be yourself. The book has a hopeful feeling to it--suggesting that even tightly controlled, unhappy people can learn to free themselves up and be more creative and expressive, and that people can blossom and grow and create change, even under sometimes oppressive environments.

Miss Hawthorn seems a little over the top--she mutters "horrid little girl" after Willow--but this exaggeration makes her a great antagonist. Because Miss Hawthorn is so oppressive and creates such an unhelpful environment, and because Willow's classmates tease her for her creative expressions, it makes the reader root all the more for Willow to stay herself and to succeed. When Willow does succeed and Miss Hawthorn is transformed, it brings a wash of good feeling.

I really like that the grumpy, controlling, flattening teacher is softened by Willow's gift, and learns and changes. I wasn't sure that i believed such a deep transformation could happen from one simple gift of an art book--but i loved the idea. The story is touching and heartwarming.

Brennan-Nelson uses language beautifully, using strong analogies to show us so much more--"Even on the sunniest days, Miss Hawthorn's art room was cold and dark...The students sat in their rows, silent and still, like eggs in a carton." Brennan-Nelson also uses evocative description to flesh out characters, such as Miss Hawthorn's moods being as dark as her clothes, and her finger long and bony, while Willow has rosy cheeks and daydreams.

Willow shows the transformative power of kindness and gifts from the heart. It reminds us that suppressing ourselves can make us unhappy, while allowing ourselves some freedom and creativity can allow us to flourish. And it encourages creativity. This would be a fantastic gift for anyone who struggles to be themselves, or for anyone wanting to be creative.

Moore's watercolor illustrations are free, expressive, colorful, and beautiful. Moore uses vibrant colors, which makes the illustrations feel like they're pulsing with energy and life. Body language is expressive; you know at a glance what the characters are feeling. The illustrations feel freely drawn, with different perspectives, varying sizes, and a gentle wildness about them keeping reader attention. Moore's illustrations remind me a little of Babette Cole's; both have that free feeling in their work.

Moore shows characters and their attitudes well, with Miss Hawthorn in dark, body-covering dresses, her hair tightly pinned back, harsh lipstick on her lips, and a scowl on her face, while Willow has bright, playful clothing, wild hair, and a smile on her face. Miss Hawthorn's transformation is dramatic, with her hair let down and beads and feathers braided into it, earrings, no harsh lipstick, and bright, hippy-ish clothes. Moore picks up the feeling of Brennan-Nelson's text perfectly, and greatly adds to the story.

Moore's free-flowing illustrations and vibrant colors encourage creativity and self expression, as does the story.

Willow is an uplifting and encouraging book with important, subtle messages. Highly recommended.

Willow was nominated for the Cybils awards.

-Added January 07, 2009


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