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STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

SCARS book cover

Kendra must face her past and stop hurting herself--before it's too late.

Awards: #1 in the Top 10 ALA Quick Picks, ALA's Rainbow List, a Governor General Literary Award Finalist, Staff Pick for Teaching Tolerance.

Yes, it's my own arm on the cover of SCARS.

HUNTED book cover

Caitlyn, a telepath in a world where having any paranormal power at all can kill her, must decide between saving herself or saving the world.

Awards: A finalist for the Monica Hughes Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy, and the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award.

PARALLEL VISIONS book cover

Kate sees visions of the future--but only when she has an asthma attack. When she "sees" her sister being beaten, and a schoolmate killing herself, Kate must trigger more attacks--but that could kill her.

Awards: 2013 Gold Winner, Wise Bear Digital Awards, YA Paranormal category.

STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

See Previous Book

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Uplifting Picture Books That Don't Preach


You Can't Take a Balloon into the Metropolitan Museum

Review

You Can't Take a Balloon into the Metropolitan Museum
by Jacqueline Preiss Weitzman, illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser
Puffin/Penguin (reprint),(2001)
ISBN-10: 0140568166
ISBN-13: 9780140568165

My rating:



In this wordless book, Weitzman has crafted a fun, amusing adventure, where the reader cares what the outcome will be, and may also absorb something about art along the way. A little girl and her grandmother visit the museum, only to be told by a guard that she must leave her balloon behind. The girl is reluctant to do so, but the guard ties her balloon to a post. A pigeon pecks the balloon free, and the guard—joined by other people the balloon has affected—chases the balloon throughout the city as it goes on a hilarious adventure, desperate to get the balloon back before the girl and her grandmother leave.

There is a lovely balance of moving between the balloon's adventure, and what the girl and her grandmother are doing, the art they're seeing. The little girl is clearly attached to her balloon, and felt badly leaving it, so this, along with switching between the balloon and the girl, increases the tension as we worry whether or not the balloon will make it back in time for the girl to get it back.

Reproductions of famous artwork are inserted throughout the pages, as the girl and her grandmother gaze at them. There are just enough to remain interesting and fun, with the wonderful illustrated story quickly moving us along. Alert readers may enjoy seeing that the adventures the balloon is having is echoed in the famous artwork, which adds another layer to the story. Artwork reproduced in the story is listed at the very end of the book, for interested readers.

Glasser's lively ink, watercolor, gouache, and colored pencil illustrations are closely observed drawings of people and things. The detailed drawings capture different people, personalities, etc. in an expressive, fun way, and visually, there is so much to look at that readers may want to spend a long time on each page, or go back and view the whole story again.

The main action is in color, with the rest of the surroundings, including people, being ink illustrations, so the forward motion of the story is easy to follow, and readers know what to pay attention to, what matters most. There are often three or more panels on each page, each enjoyable to view.

The drawings are so expressive, and clearly follow each other, that it is easy to follow the story, to see what is happening and even imagine what is being said. This is an enjoyable romp through the adventures of one yellow balloon through a city, and a girl and her grandmother's perusing through a museum. Highly recommended.

If you enjoy this book, Weitzman and Glasser have two others with the same characters and a different colored balloon—You Can't Take a Balloon into the National Gallery (2001) and You Can't Take a Balloon into the Museum of Fine Arts (2002).


Want more books?

Go back to Pure Fun: Laughter And Joy to find great Uplifting Picture Books That Don't Preach.

Or, go to Uplifting Picture Books That Don't Preach to see all of the books.